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From the 13th week of pregnancy and up to the end of the breastfeeding period

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vitamin B6
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Phase 2
From the 13th week of pregnancy and up to the end of the breastfeeding period

Folio®
Vitamin B9 (400 μg of folic acid)
Vitamin B12
Vitamin D3
Iodine
Folio® iodine-free
Vitamin B9 (400 μg of folic acid)
Vitamin B12
Vitamin D3

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Well-prepared for birth

Take some time in advance of the birth to consider what is ahead of you. Naturally, this is all theoretical, as every birth is different and also unpredictable. However, if you have already prepared mentally for childbirth, the processes which take place in your body will not come as a complete surprise and it will be easier for you to relax and adapt to them.

Particularly for the mum-to-be, it is very helpful if she knows roughly what will happen in her body.

Antenatal Classes

Visiting antenatal classes is very helpful for you and your partner! There you will not only learn how to breathe properly during contractions but you will also find out many things about childbirth and have the opportunity to ask a multitude of questions.

 

Besides this, such classes provide a great opportunity to exchange experiences with other expectant parents. How has their pregnancy been so far? Is there someone whose child is also in the breech position and does not want to turn? Is there a couple who have opted for a home birth?

 

Particularly for dads-to-be it is important to meet other "fellow sufferers". Together you can allay some of your fears and provide each other with encouragement. Perhaps you can even learn a thing or two from fathers who have already experienced childbirth. For example, that the most important thing you can do is simply to be there.
Or pragmatically seen: To provide your partner with food and drink, to support and massage her...

You can find more tips in Men in the delivery room.

 

And another tip for couples expecting their second child: You can visit a type of refresher course which not only covers birth but also focusses on coping with a small child and a baby.

Personal midwife

Decide early on if you wish to have the support of a personal (independent) midwife, who will take care of you and your baby during pregnancy, birth and the postpartum period.

 

This has the decisive advantage that you will already know each other well when the time comes to give birth. Birth is a very intimate thing and it is wonderful to have a trusted midwife at your side.

 

You can also discuss with her the issue of whether you might wish to opt for epidural anaesthesia or not.

 

Find out which costs your health insurance company covers for a personal midwife. Some provide no financial support; others pay partial sums or even cover the costs completely.

Choosing where to have your baby

Choosing where to have your baby is initially the most important consideration and should be thought through as early as possible. There are three options open to you: Birth in a hospital, in a birth centre or at home. You can find out about the advantages and disadvantages of the three options on the relevant pages.


You should take a look at the maternity wards in hospitals or visit birthing centres in advance, so that you can gain an impression of them.